Reviews

Owl by The Owl Ensemble

Essen¬≠tially, a string quar¬≠tet with a jazz pulse, Owl Ensemble exude the exquis¬≠ite mel¬≠an¬≠cho¬≠lia that comes so nat¬≠ur¬≠ally with plan¬≠gent cellos and viol¬≠ins. Theirs is music of great clar¬≠ity and space. On I See You, they point both for¬≠wards ‚Äď to the gently rip¬≠pling wave¬≠forms of min¬≠im¬≠al¬≠ism ‚Äď and back¬≠wards: to some¬≠thing that can only be described as enchant¬≠ing bush music. But though Owl‚Äôs cre¬≠at¬≠ive driv¬≠ing force, violinist/composer Olivia Moore can scrape and swing, as on the Stuff Smith-like inter¬≠lude on the ram¬≠bling Shall We Dance, her forte is art-house lyricism.‚Ķ.‚Ķ.‚Ķ.Sweet rather than severe, The Owl Ensemble tran¬≠scend from the taste¬≠ful to the sublime.

‚ÄĒ Mike Butler, M.E.N.

Amoghasiddhi

Nour­ished by Indian and jazz tra­di­tions, but with an eleg­ance that comes from her clas­sic­al train­ing, Olivia Moore’s violin has an East­ern tang that is genu­inely entrancing.

…her obvi­ous joy in play­ing swells through her impas­sioned but restrained violin and offers her audi­ence both an emo­tion­al and a cereb­ral fulfilment.

This debut record­ing from Manchester based viol­ist Olivia Moore is bust­ling with ideas and influ­ences. A fusion album, in the tra­di­tion­al sense, Moore com­bines ele­ments of clas­sic­al Indian music, Brit­ish folk and even Nordic jazz, to pro­duce some­thing alto­geth­er fresh and cosmopolitan.

‚ÄĒ Chris Ack¬≠er¬≠ley, the Sound of Now/Jazzwise